Reviews

deb
deb
March 27, 2021.
Verified
African Safari - Trip of a Lifetime! We traveled with Jaco on a 12 day safari in June 2019 through 3 countries and had the experience of a lifetime! Our family of 4 included our 2 young adult sons. Our trip was private and customized to our preferences and budget. We felt safe from the moment that Jaco picked us up at the airport in Victoria Falls throughout the entire trip until he dropped us at the airport in Windhoek Namibia at the end of our vacation. We toured Victoria Falls, rafted the Zambezi River, walked with lions, rode elephants, learned so much about conservation and animal protection, drove quad bikes in the Namib desert, and cruised with dolphins off the Swakopmund coast in addition to the numerous safaris. So fortunate to have seen the Big Five along with so many more species, Jaco was an impeccable guide in national parks and private reserves! His knowledge and experience allowed us to see so many amazing animals. Jaco was attentive to every detail each step of the way, from the initial planning and booking to the timing of every activity along the way. When we arrived to each lodge he made sure we saw the sunset while enjoying a refreshing beverage, as he checked us in and hand delivered our luggage to our rooms. Jaco was so pleasant to work with and we appreciated his eagerness to adjust anything we desired. At the end of our trip, I had a problem with my airline ticket and Jaco stayed with us at the airport for over 3 hours until the problem was resolved. We would highly recommend Jaco and Bushtrails! I cannot say enough about Jaco and his superb customer service! Our African Safari exceeded all expectations and was truly our trip of a lifetime!
chris bergstrom
chris bergstrom
March 11, 2021.
Verified
Brilliant We have traveled numerous times to Africa. Our favorite experiences have been with Bushtrails Safaris. The personal touch by Jaco and his team exceeded all expectations. His ability to build an optimum trip based on your own personal likings are second to none.
alan s
alan s
February 11, 2021.
Verified
Don't Miss This Trip of Your Life!!!!! A phenomenal trip (September 2019). Great Guide, Great Pilot, Great Sights, Great Accommodations. ***** This was the best trip of our lives!!! We put our trust in Jaco and he tailored our private tour perfectly. Everything was taken care of. Our excursions and game drives were top notch and every day was a new adventure complete with plenty of great food, drinks and gorgeous sundowners. We not only had the sights of our lives, but also got acquainted with the local history and cultures. While our travel plans have been interrupted by the covid pandemic, we look forward to Jaco putting together another trip for us. If you have the opportunity for a Namibian adventure, Jaco is your guy!!!
Mjhebl
Mjhebl
February 10, 2021.
Verified
Amazing! Did a safari with Jaco throughout Namibia. It was a wonderful experience! Jaco is very knowledgeable and did a great job! From the itinerary to the accommodations, everything was first class. Wouldn't want to go with anyone else!
David C
David C
February 10, 2021.
Verified
Photo safari of a lifetime I have been to Namibia three times with Bushtrails on photo safaris. Jaco is a great guide and will cater your trip to the wildlife and scenic areas you would like to see. My last trip with Bushtrails I wanted to focus on the big cats. We were able to get incredibly close to lions , leopards and cheetahs and we saw kills by all three species. We also went on a river trip where we saw many elephants, hippos, water buffalo and crocodiles. Bushtrails chooses excellent accommodations for guest to stay at and the food is always good. I am currently planning another trip with Bushtrails. My last trip with Bushtrails was September 2018. September is a very good month to go. High temperatures are in the eighties with clear skies and no rain.
ScottM
ScottM
February 10, 2021.
Verified
Adventure of a lifetime My family and I were privileged to partake in the Bushtrails travel experience in Southern Africa. Jaco and his team created a family vacation for us that was without equal in terms of travel, safety, comfort, culture, dining and accommodations. For those seeking to break free at the end of this global pandemic, the open and beautiful vistas of Namibia (and its neighbors) beckon. And you will not find a better tour operator than Bushtrails. - Scott

Nambwa Camping

The splendour of Nambwa and the iconic environment it is located in, stimulate the senses and offer adventurous “wild camping” since its official opening in 2004. The location of Nambwa within the pristine and untouched Kwando Core area, has the local and migrant animal species wandering through the campsites.

Wild Horses of the Namib

A unique tourist attraction in the southern part of the Namib. There are about 150 wild Feral Horses in the area of Garub near Aus. They roam around freely and have adapted to the harsh desert conditions. They are independent of humans and are usually in excellent condition.

The Namib Desert Horse is athletic in appearance and usually dark in colour. Their most likely ancestors are a mix of riding horses and cavalry horses from German breeding programs, released from various farms and camps during World War I.

Bushman Land

Though harsh and inhospitable, this expanse of uncharted wilderness in northern Kalahari has nine different habitats and supports communities of hunter-gatherers and a high concentration of wild animals and birds. Bushmanland spans the 200km of emptiness between the prosperous farming and mining towns of Tsumeb, Grootfontein and Otavi to the border of Botswana and the Okavango Delta in the east. Cultural visits offer a fascinating experience with the Bushman communities who will take you on hunts and forages and introduce you to their customs, practices and beliefs.

Chobe National Park

Aptly and fondly known as ‘The Land of The Giants’, Chobe National Park in the north of beautiful Botswana is home to Africa’s largest elephant population and comprises more than 10,000km2 of rich ecosystems, diverse landscapes and an almost unparalleled abundance of wildlife and birdlife all centred around the stunning Chobe River, and in close proximity to a number of Southern Africa’s other safari must-sees.

Mudumu National Park

The Mudumu National Park is situated in the Caprivi Strip in north Namibia. It covers an area of 1000 km² and has a landscape of rivers, reed islands and flat areas without any natural elevation. The Park has an abundance of wildlife but is rarely visited by tourists due to its remoteness and being situated in an acute malaria area, thus the use of prophylaxis is advisable when visiting. The southern part of the Park has a lot of water with elephants, zebras, antelopes, buffalos, hippos and crocodiles. It also has more than 400 different species of birds.

Bwabwata National Park

Bwabwata National Park is the second-largest national park in Namibia, and one of five neighbouring national parks located in the north-eastern part of the country. The ecosystem of the park is comprised of woodlands, riverine woodlands, shrub savanna, floodplains, and the Okavango Valley.  Shelter is provided by African and Zambezi teak trees and wild seringa, Elephants form the backbone of the wildlife species among a variety of predators and grazers.

Mahango National Park

Mahango National Park is situated on the Botswana border next to the Okavango river.  It covers an area of 250 km2 and is open throughout the year to day visitors only.Two game viewing roads provide the opportunity to view the diverse wildlife along the waterways. Over 400 species of birds have been recorded, and it supports vulnerable species of elephant, hippo and lion. The Park is renowned for its baobab trees.

Okahandja Woodcarvers Market

The Okahandja Mbangura Woodcarvers Craft Market is situated at the Southern Entrance to the city of Okahandja.  Woodcarvers from all over Namibia, who practice their ancient skills, market their goods at the market.

Joe’s Beerhouse

Joe’s Beerhouse is for those who like the road less travelled. A place where the unexpected can occur, where quirky is normal, and where nothing is ordinary. A bit like Namibia really. Comfortably, gloriously different. The restaurant is divided into five different sections, each with its own unique ambience. Forget gourmet, think great tasty authentic cooking. This is not fine dining, it’s fine eating. Joe’s is a little bit rustic, a whole lot casual… with a sensational steak house menu concentrating on Namibia’s exotic game meat. Yes, yes, you can have your salads and vegetarian dishes… but be prepared for Namibian-size portions.

Wolwedans Dunes Lodge

Located in the heart of NamibRand Nature Reserve in southern Namibia.

Each of the nine spacious chalets has en-suite bathrooms and a private veranda.

Okavango River

The Okavango River in Namibia is the fourth-longest river system in southern Africa, running south-eastward for 1,600 km. It begins at 1,300 m altitude in Angola, forms part of the border to Namibia, and then flows into Botswana. The Okavango does not have an outlet to the sea but discharges into the Okavango Delta in the Kalahari Desert. The wildlife of the Okavango Delta is varied and plentiful thanks to the rich ecosystems and protection. It includes African bush elephant, buffalo, hippopotamus, blue wildebeest, giraffe, Nile crocodile, lion, cheetah, leopard, hyena, kudu, sable antelope, black and white rhinoceros, zebra, warthog, baboons and the endangered African wild dog. It also contains over 500 species of birds and 85 species of fish.

Onguma The Fort

Part of the Onguma Game Reserve, situated on the eastern border of Etosha National Park.

Each suite’s lounge is complete with a satellite television system, bar fridge, and telephone facilities.

Accommodation includes 11 bush sites, 1 sultan suite, and 1 honeymoon suite.

The Fort has no fences and therefore no children under the age of 7 years will be allowed.

Okaukuejo

Located in the south of Etosha National Park, 17 km from Anderson Gate. Famous for its floodlit waterhole, Okaukuejo offers a variety of accommodation options and amenities.

The Kingdom

A luxury hotel located at the centre of Victoria Falls town and 5 minutes walk from the Victoria Falls.

All rooms are en-suite and equipped with air conditioning, satellite TV, telephone, hairdryer, safe and tea/coffee-making facilities.

Chobe Princess Houseboat

The Chobe Princess Houseboats are located on the Chobe River, within the Chobe National Park. Accessible from Kasane through Kasane immigration. With only a small number of passengers on board, staying here is like being on your own houseboat.

The Stiltz

Wooden bungalows built on stilts, minutes away from Swakopmund’s town centre.

Accommodation includes 8 bungalows, family bungalow and 2 villas.

For safety reasons children under the age of 12 are not recommended, however, should parents accept full responsibility children are welcome to accompany their parents.

The Nest Hotel

The award-winning Lüderitz Nest Hotel is one of Namibia’s favourite hotels (est. 1998) and is located directly on the rocks and sea with its own private tidal beach and walk-on jetty – unique in Namibia.

Accommodation includes Executive Suites, Deluxe and Comfort Rooms (air-conditioned), Single, Twin, Double and Family Rooms.

Victoria Falls Hotel

Perfectly positioned within the town to enjoy all that Victoria Falls offers to the fullest. Built in 1904, The Victoria Falls Hotel was the very first hotel to be built in Victoria Falls. The hotel exudes original colonial Edwardian charm but recent refurbishments offer guests the modern comforts one would expect from a luxury hotel.

Onguma Tented Camp

Onguma Tented Camp is in the Onguma Game Reserve.

The best feature of the camp is the luxury tents, each with a view over the waterhole. The tents all have an indoor bath with a luxury outdoor shower.

There are no fences and therefore no children under the age of 12 years will be allowed.

Kwando River

Meandering through the spectacular Caprivi Strip in northwest Namibia, the Kwando River rises from the central Angolan highlands forming the boundary between Namibia, Zambia and Angola. The area surrounding the Kwando River is known for its protected game reserves, national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. It offers excellent game viewing with the perennial waters of the river attracting plentiful wildlife including large herds of elephant, hippos, crocodiles, red lechwe, turtles, zebra, impala, spotted-necked otters and over 400 species of bird.

Zambezi River

The Zambezi is the fourth-longest river in Africa, and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from Africa. For 500 km it serves as the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe thundering over the Victoria Falls and through the narrow  Batoka Gorge, providing a fantastic playground for white-water rafting, kayaking, river boarding and jet boating.

Benefitting from numerous conservation initiatives, it provides sustenance to a diverse array of game, birdlife and fish species. The riverine woodlands support many large animals, such as buffalo, zebra, giraffe, and elephant.

Mowani Mountain Camp

In Damaraland, there is a sanctuary – Mowani Mountain Camp.

Accommodation include mountain suite, mini suite, luxury room and 12 superior view rooms.

Okonjima

Okonjima is a nature reserve and Big Cat Sanctuary in Namibia with frequent leopard and cheetah sightings.  It is spread across 220km2 within Namibia’s scenic Central Highlands halfway between Windhoek and the Etosha National Park, Okonjima Nature Reserve’s conservation work is underpinned by the AfriCat Foundation, which spearheads the conservation of carnivores, including brown hyena, aardvark and pangolin. There are also mountain zebra, blue wildebeest and giraffe, as well as numerous antelope. Birdlife is impressive too with many eagles and vultures.

AfriCat Foundation

Amazing work is being done by AFRICAT to rehabilitate cheetahs and other wild cats.  Among the carnivores being rescued, researched and rehabilitated by them are cheetah, leopard, lion, caracal, wild dog and hyaena. AFRICAT has had to take on a large number of captive cats/carnivores no longer wanted by other establishments.

Africat Carnivore Centre

Caring for Carnivores Project. Observe how the animals at AfriCat are being housed in spacious enclosures of between twelve and fifty acres in a natural, stress-free environment. Providing a ‘healthy living environment’ for large carnivores in temporary or permanent captivity is fundamental to minimising illness and injuries. They are fed a well-balanced diet and vitamin and mineral supplements are used to prevent deficiencies. The animals are observed daily to monitor their wellbeing and condition, ensuring a quick response and treatment for any illness or injuries that may occur.

Solitaire

Solitaire is a small solitary settlement in central Namibia near the popular Namib-Naukluft National Park.

Situated at the junction of two major tourist routes, between the dunes at Sossusvlei and the coast at Walvis Bay, as well as to the capital Windhoek. It features the only fuel/gas station, Moose McGregor’s Desert Bakery (famous for thier apple pie), cafe, chapel and general dealer. As the surrounding area is sparsely populated, it is a common stopover for tourists. It also contains public restrooms, a tyre repair workshop, a motel and a campsite. An abundance of car wrecks has been picturesquely draped along the road into Solitaire.

Spreetzhoogte Pass

Spreetshoogte Pass is the steepest pass in Namibia, as well as the one straddling the biggest elevation difference, descending almost 1,000 metres within 4 kilometres of road. The top of the pass features a resting place from which there are views into the adjacent Namib desert. The pass was erected during World War II by farmer Nicolaas Spreeth, fortifying the path with quartzite rocks and patches of road ahead of every steep ascent. He built the pass literally with his own hands and dynamite. The pass today is part of the district road from Rehoboth to Solitaire traversing the Escarpment geological feature.

Skeleton Coast National Park

Skeleton Coast National Park is located alongside the Atlantic Coast in northwest Namibia and has mostly inaccessible shores, dotted with shipwrecks. The Park covers a large area of 16,845 km2. The southern section is open to 4 wheel drive vehicles, but the northern section can only be reached by a fly-in safari. The climate is inhospitable with dense ocean fogs. The coast is largely soft sand and high dunes, occasionally interrupted by rocky outcrops and gravel plains.

Sesriem Canyon

Sesriem Canyon is one of the most popular destinations in Namibia. It is located 4 km from Sesriem, a small settlement in the Namib Desert which forms the main access point to the Namib-Naukluft National Park with its famous Sossusvlei tourist attraction. The Sesriem Canyon is a natural canyon carved by the Tsauchab river in the local sedimentary rock, about one kilometre (58 mi) long and up to 30 metres (100 ft) deep. Sesriem Canyon is only two metres (6.5 feet) wide in some places and has a portion that permanently contains water, which many animals use. 

Rundu

Rundu is a place to unwind and relax. It is the capital of the Kavango-East Region, located on the banks of the Kavango River in northern Namibia, on the border with Angola.

Rundu Open Market is a major tourist attraction and features a woodcarver’s market with unique wooden sculptures. Several local restaurants serve traditional food and fish from the Okavango River. Fishing, boat cruises and water sports are popular, as well as game drives and cultural activities.

Orange River

The Orange River is the longest river within the borders of South Africa and the Orange River Basin extends extensively from Lesotho through South Africa and Namibia to the Atlantic Ocean. It plays an important economic role by providing water for irrigation and hydroelectric power.

It is also known as the River of Diamonds, since large diamonds such as the Eureka Diamond and Star of South Africa were discovered close to the river, causing a diamond rush.

Kunene River

The Kunene river flows for 1,050 km from the Angola highlands southwards to the border with Namibia until it reaches the Atlantic Ocean. The basin area covers 106 560 km².

Tourism attractions include the Epupa and Ruacana waterfalls, and rafting along wild untamed scenery.  A vast array of wildlife can be sighted along the way, especially close to the Etosha National Park. These include lions, desert elephants, giraffes, wildebeest, zebra and antelope.

Windhoek

Windhoek is the capital and largest city of Namibia, located in central Namibia. It is the social, economic, political, and cultural centre of the country. Set amidst rolling hills, the city and suburbs span about 14 km by 7 km with a population of 446,000 people. The city is clean, well-structured and has a diverse range of cultural attractions, architecture and entertainment. Hot days and warm nights make it a city worth exploring.

Himba Village

This tour is an amazing photographic and souvenir collection opportunity. The Himba Tribe is one of the last tribes in Namibia that still embraces centuries-old traditions and customs. The Himba Orphan Village will give you an in-depth experience of the Himba tribe living in their Heritage. The funds generated by these tours are used to take care of the orphans and the families in the village.  

This Village portrays the ultimate Ovahimba cultural experience.

Hoanib River Valley

The Hoanib River Valley is one of the last true wilderness areas in Namibia, and one of the last settlements of desert elephants. Located in the north-western corner of Namibia, it is characterised by rolling dunes, rocky mountains and desert plains all crisscrossed by ancient, dry riverbeds. Its length is 270 km. Elephants and other wildlife use the valley as a migration route. Other animals include lions, rhino, giraffes and many species of antelope. Adventure tourism is becoming important. At night the stars are spectacular.

Huab River Valley

The Huab River is ephemeral in the Kunene Region of north-western Namibia, flowing to the Skeleton Coast and the Atlantic Ocean. It includes the Twyfelfontein World Heritage Site.

The scenery is remarkably varied and dramatic: camelthorn, mopane and ana trees line the sides of the riverbed, huge sandy valleys are dotted with gigantic boulder outcrops and rocky hills, red-rock mountains punctuate the horizon, and massive dunes studded with black volcanic rocks make the desert elephants walking below them seem tiny.

Unique tourist attractions are the ancient rock engravings and Petrified Forest with its fossilised trees.

Chobe River

The Chobe River is an unsurpassed tourist destination with a wide variety of wildlife, birds and fish. Boat cruises and game drives along the river create excellent photographic experiences. The Chobe River area has the largest concentration of African elephants in the world, with up to 150,000 on both sides of the river. This life-giving mass of water flows for 731 km through Angola, Namibia and Botswana before passing through the spectacular Chobe National Park into the Zambezi river.

Divundu

Divundu is a quaint village on the south-eastern banks of the Okavango River in Namibia. Game drives to the nearby national park, Bwabwata National Park, are well known for their diversity of wildlife in typical riverine and swampland habitats. The myriad of species includes the Big 5, Nile crocodile, Zebra and the endangered Wild Dog. The Okavango Delta is a bird viewer’s dream with over 500 species of birds.  Fishing is sought after with 85 species of fish recorded. Boat cruises to the spectacular Popa Falls are popular, as well as guided village tours.

Victoria Falls

One of the greatest attractions in Africa and one of the most spectacular waterfalls in the world, Victoria Falls is located on the Zambezi River and is the only waterfall in the world with a length of more than 1 km and a height of more than 100 m. The noise of Victoria Falls can be heard from a distance of 40 km while the spray and mist from the falling water rises to a height of over 400 m and can be seen from a distance of 50 km. No wonder that the local tribes used to call the waterfall Mosi-o-Tunya “The smoke that thunders”.

Kasane

Kasane is a town in Botswana, close to Africa’s ‘Four Corners’, where four countries almost meet: Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. It is at the far north-eastern corner of Botswana where it serves as the administrative centre of the Chobe District. Kasane briefly obtained international fame as the location of the remarriage of Elizabeth Taylor to Richard Burton, in 1975.

Victoria Falls

Victoria Falls National Park is the Zimbabwe protected area of the shared natural wonder of Victoria Falls with Zambia’s protected area being Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park.  Together, these two national parks protect the world’s largest waterfall.

Elephant, buffalo, white rhino, eland, hippo, and varying antelope can be experienced with short game drives in the park. 

Victoria Falls is the highlight of the national park. It is one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

Onguma Bush Camp

Situated within the Onguma Game Reserve. It borders on the eastern side of the Etosha National Park at Fisher’s Pan.

Accommodation include 14 twin bedded rooms, 3 family units and 1 settlers room.

Hakusembe

Situated 16km from Rundu in the Kavango region.

Accommodation includes twin-, triple- and family -bungalows and Hakusembe Villa.

Boma Restaurant

An unforgettable African experience infused with Zimbabwean cuisine, The Boma- Place of Eating is a Must-Do whilst in Victoria Falls.

Under the trees, but partially open to the African skies, it offers a unique experience that bombards the senses with the tastes, sights, sounds and smells of Africa – together with the warmth and hospitality of Zimbabwe and its people. Experience Africa in all its glory!

Fish River Canyon

The magnificent Fish River Canyon in Southern Namibia is 350 million years old – the largest canyon in Africa, and the second-largest in the world. The slithering ravine meanders alongside the longest river in Namibia, covering 160 x 27 km, and cutting 550 meters deep into a dry, stony plateau, sparsely covered with hardy plants. The river usually floods in late summer and flows intermittently the rest of the year to form a chain of long narrow pools. This destination belongs on your bucket list.

Kaokoland

Covering around 50 000 square kilometres in the northwest of Namibia, the Kaokoland is an unspoiled wilderness popular among outdoor enthusiasts. It is bounded by the vast Skeleton Coast, Angola, and the Namib Desert. It is home to the nomadic Himba tribe famous for the ochre pigments they cover themselves with. The region is also a refuge for desert elephants that have adapted to the harsh climate.

Damaraland

Damaraland was a name given to the north-central part of what later became Namibia, inhabited by the Damaras. Damaraland has dramatic collections of landscapes – from red granite mountains and high red dunes to lush valleys and lagoons with aquatic birds. Damaraland is also one of the last unofficial wildlife regions with desert-adapted animals like elephant, lion, black rhino, giraffe, gemsbok, zebra and hyena. The mountains contain amazing caves and prehistoric rock art.

Brandberg

Brandberg Mountain is Namibia’s highest mountain and a popular challenge for mountaineers. Located in Damaraland, in the Namib Desert near the coast, it covers an area of approximately 650 km². With its highest point, the Königstein (King’s Stone) 2573m above sea level and located on the flat Namib gravel plains, it can be seen from a great distance. The Brandberg is famous for its 50.000 rock paintings, up to 4000 years old.

Twyfelfontein

Twyfelfontein is a UNESCO World Heritage Site with almost 2,500 ancient rock engravings in northwest Namibia. It is officially known as Uri-Ais (meaning jumping waterhole). It consists of a spring in a valley flanked by the slopes of a sandstone table mountain with very little rainfall and a wide range of diurnal temperatures. The site has been inhabited for 6,000 years by hunter-gatherers and Khoikhoi herders. The motives of the rock engravings are hunting scenes with bow and arrow, and animal engravings of antelopes, zebras, giraffes, lions, and even a seal.

Walvis Bay

Walvis Bay (meaning Whale Bay) is the second-largest city in Namibia with 85,000 inhabitants and covers 29 square kilometres. The bay is a haven for sea vessels because of its natural deepwater harbour. Rich in plankton and marine life, these waters draw large numbers of southern right whales, attracting whalers and fishing vessels. The town is situated just north of the Tropic of Capricorn at the end of the TransNamib Railway to Windhoek.

Skeleton Coast

The wild Skeleton Coast is known as the largest ship cemetery in the world with more than a thousand vessels of various sizes littering the rugged coast. The name is derived from the whale and seal bones that once littered the shore from the whaling industry. It stretches along the entire northern part of the Atlantic coast of Namibia. The local Bushmen called the region “The Land God Made in Anger”, and Portuguese sailors referred to it as “The Gates of Hell”. A spooky place with scary stories.

Namib-Naukluft National Park

The Namib Naukluft Park is an ecologically protected area of almost 50,000 km² along the Atlantic coast of Namibia. It is covered with dune fields and is part of the famous Namib Skeleton Coast National Park with thousands of shipwrecks along the wild shoreline. The main visitor attraction is Sossusvlei, a clay pan surrounded by dunes, and Sesriem, a small canyon of the Tsauchab. The Naukluft Mountains are almost 2000 meters high, with dramatic blood-red granites and sandstone. Over 200 species of birds have been recorded in the Park, and many mammals like zebra, oryx, kudu, springbok, klipspringer and warthog. Plants include the weird desert plant Welwitschia mirabilis and aloe plants like the Quiver tree.

Lüderitz

Luderitz is a quaint harbour town on the southern Atlantic Coast in Namibia. It boasts German history, art-deco architecture, a fascinating museum and excursions to the ghost town of Kolmanskop. Although surrounded by the Namib Desert, the abundant marine and birdlife include flamingos, ostriches, penguins, dolphins and seals. Harbour cruises and walks on the beach are popular and you can even dig for treasure on Agate Beach to find your own Desert Rose of crystallised gypsum. The restaurants specialise in delicious seafood meals.

Swakopmund

Swakopmund on the coast of western Namibia in the Namib Desert is the fourth largest city in Namibia with almost 45,000 inhabitants, covering 196 km². It is a favourite beach resort destination with moderate temperatures. Tourists enjoy boat trips, hot air ballooning, sandboarding, surfing and delicious local Cuisine. Founded in 1892 as the main harbour for German South-West Africa and a good example of their colonial architecture. The  German influences remain evident by German street names and the German language being spoken by the locals.

Erindi Private Game Reserve

Erindi Private Game Reserve is a protected reserve in Namibia, located on a central plateau about 3 hours drive from Windhoek. It is home to many successful conservation projects to ensure the recovery and ecological balance between vegetation, herbivores and predators. The large carnivores that can be found in the reserve include cheetah, leopard, lion, brown hyena, spotted hyena, and African wild dog.

NamibRand Nature Reserve

The NamibRand Nature Reserve, located in southern Namibia, is a private nature reserve established to help protect and conserve the unique ecology and wildlife of the southwest Namib Desert. This is critically important in order to facilitate seasonal migratory wildlife routes and to protect biodiversity. It is probably the largest private nature reserve in southern Africa, extending over an area of more than 200,000 ha. Virtually all facets of the Namib Desert are represented on the Reserve – sand and gravel plains and stretches of savanna alternate with mountain ranges, inselbergs and vegetated dune belts.

Namib Desert

The name Namib means “vast place” and is the oldest desert in the world and stretches over 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) along the Atlantic coast of Southern Africa. It is almost completely uninhabited by humans except for small settlements. Yet some animals and plants have managed to adapt to the harsh life, including Desert Elephants, Mountain Zebra, Gemsbok, moles and snakes. Plants include succulents and the shrub Welwitschia which can live for 1,000 years!

Kolmanskop Ghost Town

The desolate ghost town of Kolmanskop lies ten kilometres inland from the port town of Lüderitz. It was named after a transport driver named Johnny Coleman who, during a sand storm, abandoned his ox wagon on a small incline opposite the settlement. During the diamond boom of 1910, it became a rich town but is now deserted and a tourist destination run by the joint firm Namibia-De Beers.

Aus

The tranquil village Aus was a German Prisoner of War Camp during World War 1. What makes it special today is the herd of almost 200 feral horses in the area. These hardy athletic horses have adapted to the harsh desert climate. Tourists can watch them at the Garub artificial water hole. Aus is located in the Karas Region of southern Namibia – 125 km east of Lüderitz. It is small but has several amenities including a hotel, police station, shop and garage. The name is derived from the Khoi word Aus, meaning “place of snakes”.

Kalahari Desert

The Kalahari desert with its vast plains and undulating red dunes offers a unique experience. The Kalahari is a large basin-like plain, covering an area of 930 000 square kilometers in Southern Africa, merging with Namibia. Kalahari means “Great thirst” or “Waterless place”, but it will quench your thirst for adventure.

Zimbabwe

Namibia, a country in southwest Africa, is distinguished by the Namib Desert along its Atlantic Ocean coast. The country is home to diverse wildlife, including a significant cheetah population. The capital, Windhoek, and coastal town Swakopmund contain German colonial-era buildings. In the north, Etosha National Park’s salt pan draws game including rhinos and giraffes.

Zambia

Zambia is a large country in Africa with a population of 13 million. It has 73 different ethnic groups and almost as many languages.

Zambia is landlocked and surrounded by 7 countries: Angola, Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

There are numerous ecosystems in Zambia, such as forest, thicket, woodland and grassland. One-third of the country is made up of national parks, and all of Africa’s Big Five can be found there, including lions, rhinos and elephants. A total of 242 mammal species are found in the country, 757 bird species, 490 fish species, and 3,543 species of wild flowering plants – a wildlife tourist’s dream.

Zambia also shares the spectacular Victoria Falls with Zimbabwe – 108 metres high  and also known as “The smoke that thunders.”

Botswana

Botswana is a landlocked sovereign country in Southern Africa, bordered by Zimbabwe, South Africa and Namibia. Its transport system is well developed with a network of railway lines, roads, and airports.

The population is 2,3 million. The economy relies mainly on mining and tourism.  Tourists love to observe the wildlife spread over many nature reserves in the Okavanga Delta, Kalahari desert, grasslands and savannas. Chobe National Park has the world’s largest concentration of African elephants and 350 species of birds. Other animal species include Lion, Rhino, African wild dogs, blue wildebeest and antelope.

Many tourists visit the Capital Gaborone to explore activities like the Lion Amusement Park, Yacht Club, Fishing Club, Gaborone Dam and Nature Reserve, as well as several museums and golf courses. Botswana offers tourism for every taste.

Etosha National Park

The Etosha National Park is a nature conservation area in northern Namibia and is one of the most significant game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of nearly 223,000km² and is completely fenced for the protection of the animals. The large mammals in Etosha National Park include lion, leopard, elephant, rhino, giraffe, wildebeest, cheetah, hyena, mountain and plains zebra, springbok, kudu, gemsbok and eland.  Within the eastern part of the park, an approximately 5.000 km² large salt pan can be found, which was formed 2 million years ago when the Kunene Delta dried up and its river bed shifted.

Lüderitz Dolphin Cruise

Enjoy a trip on the Penguin catamaran to Halifax Island, home of a colony of African penguins. On route, we’ll cruise past the old whaling station at Stromvogelbucht, through Shearwater bay and around Diaz Point. Expect to see a host of marine wildlife including heavy side dolphins, aquatic birds, seals and even whales. The luxurious catamaran offers the perfect ride for the whole family – with shelter from the
wind.

Chobe Safari Lodge

On the banks of the Chobe River in Botswana, close to where the borders of four African countries meet – Botswana, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Zambia.

Accommodation includes 46 Safari Rooms, 22 Luxurious River Rooms and 8 Thatched Rondavels.

Victoria Falls Lion Encounter

Lion Walking is a once in a lifetime activity. Accompanied by guides and handlers, you will interact with young cubs between 3 to 16 months old in the bush, and watch as they learn, explore and play while being informed about the rehabilitation programme.  It’s an opportunity to learn about the species as well as get some fantastic photos – and memories! The lions roam freely and, proving that the project is well supervised and managed

Namushasha

Situated on the banks of the Kwando River in eastern Caprivi about 24 km south of Kongola close to Mudumu and Mamili National Park.

Accommodation includes 25 rooms, 4 fully-equipped, self-catering tents, a restaurant, a bar and a swimming pool as well as a campsite.

Divava Lodge

The resort is located in the Bagani area, close to Divundu. The resort is built on the Okavango river banks, next to the Popa Falls.

Accommodation includes 20 luxury chalets that are located on a high riverbank, giving you an incredible overview of the Okavango River.

Nunda River Lodge

Situated in the Kavango, eastern region of Namibia, in close proximity of two game parks, Mahango and the Buffalo Core areas.

Accommodation includes 7 large en-suite meru tents, 8 Large thatched en-suite bungalows and 3  thatched en-suite chalets.

Canyon Lodge

Located 20km east of the Fish River Canyon, this Namibia lodge is positioned in the Gondwana Canyon Park. Canyon Lodge is a child-friendly lodge.

Accommodation includes 20 chalets built around granite boulders.

Canyon Village

Canyon Village is situated in the Gondwana Canyon Park about 20 km from the Fish River Canyon.

Accommodation includes: 42 cottages built in the Cape Dutch style.

Twyfelfontein

Twyfelfontein Country Lodge is situated in the Huab valley in Damaraland.

Accommodation includes 56 Twin, Double, Triple and Interleading Rooms.

It also has 1 luxury suite with own lounge, kitchen nook, private pool, private terrace, balcony, satellite television, king size bed, spacious full bathroom and mini bar.

Tiger Fishing

Experience the adrenalin rush of catching one of the strongest fighting fresh water fish in the world: the notorious Tiger Fish. Like the piranha, individual tigerfish have interlocking, razor-sharp teeth, along with streamlined, muscular bodies, and are extremely aggressive and capable predators who often hunt in groups. The African tigerfish is the first freshwater fish recorded and confirmed to attack and catch birds in flight.

Stanley Livingston Game Reserve Game Drive

The Stanley and Livingstone Private Game Reserve is situated a convenient 10-minute drive from Victoria Falls Town. The reserve is home to the Big Five.

Go in search of the Big Five guided by knowledgeable rangers and experience the sights, sounds and smells of Africa first hand. The morning game drive concludes with a bush breakfast. The afternoon game drive ends at sunset making a stop with some snacks and drinks as you watch the sun set behind the African bush, accompanied by birdsong and wildlife game sounds. Make your trip impossible to forget.

Victoria Falls Elephant Encounter

The Wild Horizons Elephant Sanctuary and Orphanage is home to several rescued and resident African Elephants that have been cared for, in Victoria Falls, for many years  It was formerly used for the elephant back safari activity.

Hot Air Balloon Safari

Viewing the world’s oldest desert from this unique angle will be the highlight of your tour. Set out on the flight of a lifetime at sunrise and soar with the winds for an hour, crossing mesmerizing waves of sand and mountains with endless vistas of fluctuating shadow and light. Your destination will be the exquisite Sossusvlei dunes – the splendour of the desert.

This unique adventure includes the hot air balloon flight, champagne breakfast, flight certificate, Park or Reserve Fees and return transfers.

Leopard Tracking

Get close to elusive leopards thanks to tracking systems and professional guides. Despite being notoriously shy, leopard sightings are common on Okonjima’s 20,000-hectare reserve. These magnificent big cats roam freely on the reserve, and you can radio track them from the comfort of a game-viewing vehicle.  While some of the leopards are collared for the purpose of research, they all roam freely and hunt their own prey. Heading out in an open 4×4 game vehicle with an experienced guide and tracker offers guests an incredible experience to get close to these incredible cats. Tracking leopards in such vast landscapes can be challenging and even with experienced guides, sightings are not always guaranteed, but this just adds to the anticipation. Morning or afternoon game drives.

Game Drives

Namibia is world-famous for its magnificent Game Drives where tourists can experience the magic of getting close to wild animals. It provides a different kind of safari experience with its dramatic, sparse landscapes and widely dispersed wildlife. Depending on the drive and specific location you can expect to encounter anything from rhinos and elephants to large crocodiles and hippos to stunning birdlife and Springbok, Oryx, desert-dwelling lions and so much more.

Scenic Flights

Get a bird’s eye view of the Skeleton Coast and the Namib Desert, where you are offered the best in exclusive and luxury scenic flights across the magic desert, with famous sights like Kuiseb Canyon, Sossusvlei and Sandwich Harbour being some of the main attraction depending on the itinerary.

Bushman Living Cultural Museum